EXPLAINER

Explainer: What is vaping?

SMOKESCREEN: Warnings about the rise in young people taking up e-cigarettes are increasing, leading to a variety of education strategies. Picture: Shutterstock
SMOKESCREEN: Warnings about the rise in young people taking up e-cigarettes are increasing, leading to a variety of education strategies. Picture: Shutterstock

Parents, school principals, youth centres and researchers have sounded the alarm bell about the rise in young people taking up e-cigarettes across the country.

The devices, also known as vapes, are a relatively new phenomenon compared with traditional smoking, leaving some schools and communities unsure about how to properly address the issue. NSW Secondary Principals' Council Hunter president Mark Snedden said his colleagues were reporting students from years seven to 12 bringing e-cigarettes to school.

Many schools in the northern beaches have run vaping education sessions, and are adopting a zero tolerance approach to vaping in schools alongside education sessions for students and their carers aimed at highlighting the dangers of vaping and other drug use.

What is vaping?

Vaping refers to the use of battery-powered devices that heat a liquid to deliver vapour for users to inhale, similar to smoking traditional cigarettes. An e-cigarette contains a cartridge that is filled with liquid, which may or may not contain nicotine and various flavours such as chocolate, fruits and candies. The liquids may also contain other toxins and heavy metals such as chromium, aluminium, arsenic, copper, lead, nickel and tin. The physical designs of e-cigarettes have many forms, including traditional cigarettes, cigars, USBs and highlighters. Some have also been designed as part of hoodies' drawstrings. The first commercialised e-cigarette was developed in China in 2003.

Is it rising among youth?

In Australia between 2016 and 2019, current e-cigarette users aged 15-24 increased by about 72,000 (95.7 per cent increase) for a total of about 147,000, the department of health stated in December 2020. For 12-17-year-olds, a 2017 Cancer Council report about Australian secondary school students' use of tobacco and illicit substances found around 14 per cent indicated they had used an e-cigarette at least once and 32 per cent of these students had used one in the past month. Similarly, the National Drug Strategy Household Survey 2019 said that while e-cigarettes rose across most age groups, the rise among young adults was particularly notable. "Nearly two in three current smokers and one in five non-smokers aged 18-24 reported having tried e-cigarettes," the survey said. Among those who had tried them, frequency of their use also increased, with more people using them at least monthly - from 10.3 to 17.9 per cent from 2016 to 2019.

 UNKNOWN: Principal Mark Snedden said vaping could be considered "more dangerous" than smoking traditional tobacco cigarettes. "We know how dangerous tobacco is, we don't know how dangerous these things are yet." Picture: Adam McLean

UNKNOWN: Principal Mark Snedden said vaping could be considered "more dangerous" than smoking traditional tobacco cigarettes. "We know how dangerous tobacco is, we don't know how dangerous these things are yet." Picture: Adam McLean

Health effects

The Australian Department of Health says that even though scientists are still learning about e-cigarettes' effects, they cannot be considered safe. "Hazardous substances have been found in e-cigarette liquids ... including formaldehyde, acetaldehyde and acrolein, which are known to cause cancer," the department states. "Some chemicals can also cause DNA damage." The department also states that research shows a strong link between the use of e-cigarettes by non-smoking youth and future smoking.

How are people under 18 accessing vapes?

The 2017 Cancer Council report found that students who had vaped most commonly reported getting e-cigarettes from friends, siblings, parents, or buying the products themselves. Dr Michelle Jongenelis, a researcher at the University of Melbourne's School of Psychological Sciences, said avenues included social media and online stores. "It actually isn't that hard to purchase an e-cigarette if you are under 18 as they are readily available online," she said. "Few online shops have controls on website visitors and those that do have controls simply ask website visitors to click a button confirming they are over 18, which of course anyone can fake." Dr Jongenelis, who published an article about the myths of e-cigarettes last year, said enforcement was "a big issue".

What does the law say?

It is illegal to sell or buy nicotine for use in e-cigarettes unless prescribed by a doctor for therapeutic purposes (e.g. to quit smoking). Under the Therapeutic Goods Administration's (TGA) Personal Importation Scheme, a medical prescription allows a user up to three-month supply of nicotine. It is illegal to sell or supply tobacco products to people under 18. Penalties for the illegal possession of liquid nicotine varies across states and territories between $1100 and $30,000 in fines and/or up to 24 months jail. As of October 1 this year, the law for consumers to import nicotine e-cigarettes will align with the law for them to buy such products domestically, the TGA announced in December 2020.

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