UPDATED

Drink spiking: Northern beaches cases under police investigation

CCTV reviewed following allegations of drink spiking in Manly

Update 11am, Wednesday, March 10

CCTV taken in a licensed premises in Manly has been review following claims by two women that their drinks had been spiked.

The women came forward to northern beaches police following a night out in Manly on Saturday, with police confirming both incidents had been investigated.

"No evidence of drink-spiking was detected," a NSW Police spokeswoman said.

The spokeswoman added that neither women sought medical treatment after they thought their drink had been spiked.

WARNING: Drink spiking is a crime, Northern Sydney Local Health District sexual assault service medical director Ellie Freedman says. Picture: Shutterstock

WARNING: Drink spiking is a crime, Northern Sydney Local Health District sexual assault service medical director Ellie Freedman says. Picture: Shutterstock

Earlier 4.30pm, Tuesday, March 9

WITH two alleged northern beaches drink spiking cases under investigation, authorities have issued a warning about just how easy it is to fall victim to the crime.

Reports of drink spiking surfaced on social media across the weekend, with northern beaches Uber driver Ellie Rumble claiming it's not the first time.

"It's becoming a major concern that more and more girls are having their drinks spiked in Manly," she posted to social media.

"Please, please keep an eye on your drinks. At least three girls that I'm aware of, with one girl needing to be resuscitated last night. She was very fortunate that her friend was a nurse."

WARNING: Alcohol is the most common drug used in drink spiking, Northern Sydney Local Health District sexual assault service medical director Ellie Freedman said.

WARNING: Alcohol is the most common drug used in drink spiking, Northern Sydney Local Health District sexual assault service medical director Ellie Freedman said.

A NSW Police spokeswoman confirmed two women have reported being a victim.

"Officers from Northern Beaches Police Area Command have received two reports of alleged drink spiking on Saturday at a licensed premises in Manly," she said. "Detectives are reviewing CCTV as the investigation continues."

The Northern Beaches Review understands the two women did not attend hospital for a toxicology test following the alleged drink spiking.

Drink spiking is illegal and unfortunately way too easy to do, Northern Sydney Local Health District sexual assault service medical director Ellie Freedman said.

"Drink spiking in itself is a crime, so giving someone something that's intoxicating with any intention is a crime, even if that intention isn't a sexual assault," she said.

People think they're either having an alcohol free drink or they think they're having a single and they're actually having a triple, or their glass of wine or their glass of beer has got a spirit put into it.

Northern Sydney Local Health District sexual assault service medical director Ellie Freedman

"The commonest way of drink spiking someone is with alcohol. The commonest thing we see is that people are much more drunk than they expect to be. People think they're either having an alcohol free drink or they think they're having a single and they're actually having a triple, or their glass of wine or their glass of beer has got a spirit put into it."

Ms Freedman said street, prescription and over-the-counter drugs can also be used by perpetrators to make their victim feel disorientated or sleepy.

"It's very difficult to tell from specifics symptoms what drug people have been given," she said.

"Generally what people report is that they feel more affected by whatever they were drinking than they would expect to be. In order to prove drink spiking someone would need to take urine and blood tests and then in terms of proving it you'd need to put what in your drink.

"It's not just people who have access to street drugs or prescription medication, it's that it actually can be very easy to do and very hard to prove."

What to do if your drink has been spiked

  • Make sure you have someone to look after you.
  • If you're worried about feeling very unwell seek medical attention or call an ambulance.
  • Generally most drinking spiking victims just need to rehydrate and sleep it off.

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